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Female Hormones

We have a customised compounding lab totally dedicated to manufacturing hormones to assist with women's health. The most commonly prescribed hormones are:
  • Oestrogens
  • Progesterone
  • Testosterone
  • DHEA
  • Melatonin
  • Oxytocin
  • Pregnenalone
  • Cortisol

Oestrogens are the sex hormones produced primarily by a female's ovaries. There are three basic Oestrogens, namely Oestrone (E1), Oestradiol (E2), and Oestriol (E3). Collectively, these oestrogens regulate a diverse array of chemically induced processes within the female body among which are the menstrual cycle, intercourse preparation and during intercourse functions, as well as impact mood, sleep quality, body fat levels, water retention, etc. As with testosterone, oestrogen is present with both genders, women produce appreciatively more at approximately 0.5 mg daily. Aging, illness, and certain cancer treatments can adversely affect the body's delicate hormonal balance, causing changes in sexual interest and functioning. The most familiar of these changes occurs when a women go through menopause. Oestrogen production drops throughout this process as women exit their child-bearing years.

Menopause is a naturally occurring biologic process in women. It is defined as the permanent end of menses and fertility occurring 12 twelve months after a patients last menstruation. This happens when the female’s ovaries stop producing eggs and her body produces fewer hormones (oestrogen and progesterone). Menstrual periods generally become either more closely or more widely spaced, but may even come to a sudden stop. An irregularity in menstrual cycles can occur for one to three years. The onset typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 55. Even though it is a natural process and not a medical illness, it still can have dramatic effects on a women’s mental and physical health. These effects vary dramatically from one patient to another and are caused by the changes in the oestrogen and progesterone.

The symptoms of menopause usually begin with hot flushes or sweats that are usually at their worst for the first year or two. Other common symptoms include skin flushing, racing heart, and insomnia (trouble sleeping). This change in hormones may also cause forgetfulness, mood swings, decreased sex drive, anxiety and even depression in some women. It is important that women see their physician in the years prior to menopause, also known as perimenopause, so they learn what is expected and look for any preventative healthcare options.

We suggest blood and urine and saliva tests to measure changes in hormones and recommend the best treatment. Some things patients can do on their own to help manage the symptoms are reduce intake of caffeine, alcohol and spicy foods. Getting regular exercise and performing relaxation techniques such as yoga can also decrease the severity. Although for many women, these actions are simply not enough and prescription treatment is needed in addition. The most common treatment used for the symptoms of menopause is hormone replacement therapy. Essentially hormone replacement therapy tries to mimic the natural human body’s production of those hormones to reduce those symptoms that are associated with dramatic swings in concentrations. 

Many different formulations of hormone therapy can be formulated by our compounding pharmacy to meet these individual needs. Hormones of all strengths and concentrations can be put into oral capsules, topical creams or gels, vaginal creams, suppositories, topical drops, and sublingual lozenges. There are also other prescription alternatives to hormonal therapy that may work for some women. We only use 100% Bio-Identical Hormones that in our compounds that have been assayed for quality and purity.

Hormone Replacement Therapy

Much confusion has arisen over the relaxed and sometimes generic verbiage used to describe the types of hormones used in HRT. This has become such a problem that most people don't know or realize exactly what they are talking about when they use certain hormone qualifying terms. For clarity: natural hormones are those which are produced by a living organism be it human, animal, or plant; endogenous hormones are those produced within the human body; and synthetic hormones are man-made hormones. Synthetic hormones made by pharmaceutical companies have side chains added to allow the companies to patent the hormones. Side chains may be added to a natural substance to create a synthetic product. These structural changes/differences are believed to be responsible for the side effects that are experienced when synthetic hormones are used in replacement therapy. The key to natural versus synthetic is the molecular structure of the hormone. In order for a replacement hormone to fully replicate the function and bodily acceptance of naturally produced and present in the human body (endogenous) hormones, the chemical structure must precisely match that of the original. 

 

Restoring Hormonal Balance

HRT replaces deficient hormones with those that are chemically identical to those that the body naturally produces, but which have declined due to aging or illness. HRT has improved the quality of life for millions of women and men who suffer from hormonal imbalance. The ideal process for achieving hormonal balance includes: an assessment of hormone levels: complete evaluation of signs and symptoms; replacement of the deficient hormones in the most appropriate dose via the most effective route; and the monitoring to fine tuning of therapy. Estrogens, progesterone, and androgens are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to achieving hormonal balance. Thyroid and adrenal function, as well as nutritional status, should also be evaluated and treated when indicated. The uniqueness of each person makes it incumbent upon health care professionals and patients to work together to customize hormone therapy. Through this cooperation, hormones can be compounded in the required strengths and dosages, and administered via the most appropriate preparation to best meet each individual’s needs.Menopause is a naturally occurring biologic process in women. It is defined as the permanent end of menses and fertility occurring 12 twelve months after a patients last menstruation. This happens when the female’s ovaries stop producing eggs and her body produces fewer hormones (estrogen and progesterone). Menstrual periods generally become either more closely or more widely spaced, but may even come to a sudden stop. An irregularity in menstrual cycles can occur for one to three years. The onset typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 55. Even though it is a natural process and not a medical illness, it still can have dramatic effects on a women’s mental and physical health. These effects vary dramatically from one patient to another and are caused by the changes in the estrogen and progesterone. The symptoms of menopause usually begin with hot flushes or sweats that are usually at their worst for the first year or two. Other common symptoms include skin flushing, racing heart, and insomnia (trouble sleeping). This change in hormones may also cause forgetfulness, mood swings, decreased sex drive, anxiety and even depression in some women. It is important that women see their physician in the years prior to menopause, also known as perimenopause, so they learn what is expected and look for any preventative healthcare options. Physicians can use blood and urine tests to measure changes in hormones and recommend the best treatment. Some things patients can do on their own to help manage the symptoms are reduce intake of caffeine, alcohol and spicy foods. Getting regular exercise and performing relaxation techniques such as yoga can also decrease the severity. Although for many women, these actions are simply not enough and prescription treatment is needed in addition. The most common treatment used for the symptoms of menopause is hormone replacement therapy. Essentially hormone replacement therapy tries to mimic the natural human body’s production of those hormones to reduce those symptoms that are associated with dramatic swings in concentrations. A slower reduction through prescription hormones can decrease severity of hot flushes and night sweats along with other symptoms caused by menopause. These treatments are very patient specific and vary from patient to patient. Many different formulations of hormone therapy can be formulated by compounding pharmacies to meet these individual needs. Hormones of all strengths and concentrations can be put into oral capsules, topical creams or gels, vaginal creams, suppositories, topical drops, and sublingual lozenges. There are also other prescription alternatives to hormonal therapy that may work for some women. Patients have found benefit in reduction of symptoms with the use of anti-depressant, anti-hypertensive and also anti-seizure medications. As with any medical treatment there are benefits and risks that must be weighted by the patient and their healthcare team before starting a treatment for menopause symptoms.

Click here to go to our evaluation section and here to see some of our more common female hormone products.