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Medlab MG Optima Relax Magnesium Powder 300g


General Use:

MultiBiotic™ is a multi-species probiotic that helps to support the natural balance of commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). MultiBiotic™ is used to improve symptoms of medically diagnosed Irritable Bowel Syndrome; support healthy immune function; restore GIT microbial balance after certain medication use and to relieve gastrointestinal discomfort. MultiBiotic™ contains 21.075 billion CFU of bacteria per capsule, including Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. These species are predominately found in the gastrointestinal tract.

 

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General Use:

Mg OptimaTM Relax contains evidenced-based ingredients that may support the natural metabolic pathways for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production and activity, indicated to promote relaxation during times of stress. Albion ® Magnesium bisglycinate is scientifically designed to provide a highly bioavailable form of magnesium. Magnesium may act as a GABA receptor agonist and also has a binding site on the glutamate receptors helping to regulate the activity of this main excitatory neurotransmitter.1 Glycine functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the nervous system while glutamine is a precursor to GABA production.2 Theanine is an amino acid from Green Tea that may promote relaxation via binding to glutamate receptors.3 Pyridoxal (vitamin B6) is a cofactor for the enzyme Glutamate decarboxylase that synthesises GABA from glutamate.4 Zinc also has a binding site on the glutamate receptor and may act as a modulator for both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission.5

Specific Use:

Mg OptimaTM Relax contains evidenced-based ingredients to support the natural metabolic pathways for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production and activity, indicated to promote relaxation during times of stress. Albion ® Magnesium bisglycinate is scientifically designed to provide a highly bioavailable form of magnesium. Magnesium may act as a GABA receptor agonist and also has a binding site on the glutamate receptors helping to regulate the activity of this main excitatory neurotransmitter.1 Glycine functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the nervous system while glutamine is a precursor to GABA production.2 Theanine is an amino acid from Green Tea that promotes relaxation via binding to glutamate receptors.3 Pyridoxal (vitamin B6) is a cofactor for the enzyme Glutamate decarboxylase that synthesises GABA from glutamate.4 Zinc also has a binding site on the glutamate receptor and may act as a modulator for both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission.5

Magnesium

Magnesium is predominantly located intra-cellular in bone, muscles and non-muscular soft tissues while only 1% of total magnesium is found in serum and red blood cells. Magnesium needs to be consumed in the diet regularly to prevent the risk of magnesium deficiency and due to the increased consumption of processed foods; magnesium intake in the western world is decreasing. Magnesium is a cofactor in more than 300 enzymatic reactions, critically stabilising enzymes, including many ATP-generating reactions. ATP metabolism, muscle contraction and relaxation, normal neurological function and release of neurotransmitters are all magnesium dependent.6 While evidence generally does not support the use of magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps with many studies producing null effect7,8, there is evidence to suggest oral magnesium supplementation can improve anaerobic metabolism in athletes, decreasing lactate production9 and improving physical performance in healthy elderly women involved in an exercise program.10

Magnesium may function as a GABA receptor agonist promoting the effects of GABA. Further, in the central nervous system (CNS), magnesium ions block NMDAR channels at resting membrane potentials. The binding site for magnesium ions is deep within the channel. This block is voltage-dependent but ion flux occurs when the membrane potential is depolarized. NMDAR receptors are glutamate-binding sites, being the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS.11 See Figure 1.

Fig 1. Neurotransmitter signalling12

Glycine

Glycine functions as one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS with a high density of glycine containing neurons being found in spinal cord and brain stem. When glycine binds to its receptor it opens the anion channel allowing an influx of chloride ions into the postsynaptic neuron causing hyperpolarization that raises the threshold for neuronal firing and thereby inhibits the postsynaptic neuron.2,13

Glutamine

Glutamine and glutamate are amino acids. Several studies show that concentrations of serum glutamine in the body are diminished during times of physical or psychological stress and further that patients presenting with exhaustion, anxiety, sleeplessness and lack of concentration have low serum glutamate concentration. Glutamine and glutamate synthesis occur interchangeably (see figure 2). Glutamine converts to glutamate using NADPH as a cofactor and glutamate is a precursor for GABA production using vitamin B6 as a cofactor.15-19

Fig 2. GABA is synthesized from Glutamine and Glutamate20

L-Theanine

Theanine is a novel plant-based amino acid found in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves. Theanine is an analog of glutamic acid and is able to bind to glutamate receptor subtypes (AMPA, kainite and NMDA receptors) and block the binding of glutamate to the receptors, albeit with less affinity for the receptor than glutamate.21 Studies have shown that L-Theanine is useful in the treatment of anxiety due to its ability to regulate neurotransmitter function in the CNS as well as improving the quality of sleep. L-Theanine supplementation in the standard dosages (50-250mg) has been shown to increase α-brainwaves in otherwise healthy persons, which is indicative of a perceived state of relaxation. This may only occur in persons with higher baseline anxiety or under periods of stress, but has been shown to occur during closed eye rest as well as during visuospatial tasks around 30 minutes after ingestion.22-26 See Figure 1.

When administered orally, L-Theanine peaks in serum within an hour and appears in the urine after 5 hours. Theanine reaches maximum concentration in the brain within 5 hours and gradually disappears within 24 hours. It freely crosses the blood-brain barrier and appears in the brain within an hour after ingestion.27 A recent study demonstrated that L-Theanine could cause anti-stress activity via inhibition of cortical neuron excitation. The results showed that L-Theanine intake resulted in a reduction in the heart rate (HR) and salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) responses to an acute stress task relative to the placebo control group that the authors attributed to an attenuation of sympathetic nervous activation.3

Pyridoxal 5-Phosphate (Vitamin B6)

Pyridoxine is the cofactor required by Glutamate decarboxylase to convert glutamate to GABA in the CNS.4 See Figure 2.

Zinc

Approximately 10% of total zinc in the brain is located in synaptic vesicles of certain glutamatergic neurons.5 Zinc may modulate neurotransmission mediated via both excitatory and inhibitory amino acid receptors at specific synapses for example the NMDA glutamate receptor is directly inhibited by zinc whereas GABA release from the presynapse can be potentiated (see Figure 1).28

Clinical Summary:

  • To naturally increase GABA production to induce relaxation
  • Helps relieve symptoms of nervous tension, stress and mild anxiety
  • For the symptomatic relief of stress disorders.
  • Herbal blend which helps relieve stress of study or work
  • May help reduce the frequency of migraines.
  • L-Theanine has a positive effect on mood and cognitive performance, resulting in increased energy, clarity of thought, efficiency, increased alertness and increased perceived work performance.

 

Who will benefit:

  • Those with symptoms of anxiety and nervous tension
  • Those who are experiencing mild stress and associated disorders
  • Those who are experiencing stress associated with work and/or study
  • Those with magnesium deficiency
  • Those who are experiencing frequent migraines
  • Those who wish to improve their cognitive performance and mood.
This content is intended for patient counseling purposes only. This content is for informational/educational purposes and is not intended to treat or diagnose any disease or person. No claims are made as to the safety or efficacy of mentioned preparations. The compounded medications featured in this piece have been prescribed and administered by doctors who prescribe compounds. You are encouraged to speak with your pharmacist and doctor as to the appropriate use of any medication.